Living with Clay Gallery Review

                                                Collecting a Collection

            The introductory paragraph that welcomed the gallery visitor to the entrance immediately told a story about a direct correlation to the human being and the art world. It was in my fascination of the gallery of the philosophy behind the obsession of the collectors and the artwork that was something so private yet open and inviting. Honestly, in my opinion it had been one of the best art shows that I have ever been too in Orange County. Getting a tour by Mr. Lopez made the exhibition special. There was honesty through the eyes of the curator that his show came from the heart. The special details, care to the gallery, enthusiasm, and wisdom was apparent of Rudy Lopez. The talent that Lopez had was to give life to the show. There was an energy that I felt ran though the rooms, not by the objects but by the people involved with the creations and their creators. Everything had a detailed story that seemed fascinating to everyone who had listened. The design was coherent and clear by the path the gallery lead. The viewer was able to see in order to make that special correlation to the gallery and what it was meant to convey.                                                    

Culture in itself is very representative of the history of mankind. The way Lopez showed the visitors this special exhibit was by the variety of culture, history, worth, value, delicacy, and harshness to each object on display. Ceramics being delicate creations controlled the way a viewer can look at the art. Someone who is oblivious to the process of how a simple clay pot is made was briefly explained by Mr. Lopez, in which he pointed out an intricate large piece by Hector Javier Martinez Mendez titled The Artists of Mexico. It showed the culture of the Mexican peoples and the curator explained how it was his favorite piece by pointing out the intricate Dia de los Muertos etched carvings on the pot.

            I was intrigued the first minute I walked in and saw to my right the gift made for the curator who congratulated him in his exhibit. The simple gesture of a gift coming from a fine artist seemed impressive. Patti Warshina’s Bottom Feeder caught my eye and interested me in its style and purpose. The anatomy of the figure seemed odd yet compelling with its delicate hands and feet. Calling the eyes to such a distinctive space of the gallery gave almost an introduction to the viewer and created a flow with special indicators on where to look next. It was hard to avoid staring at the large photographs on the wall in which Rudy Lopez had explained where the actual living quarters. These habitations were of the collectors and designed the space as it seemed to be theirs. For an example, the collectors living room was photographed above and directly below was furniture from that room along with the same sculptures or ceramic pieces they contained. In the presentation that Lopez gave us was an unknown fact about ceramics and dating them if they were real. He explained by wetting the bottom of the piece would give off a distinct scent or smell of the earth. This fact was fun and interesting.

            The connection of the clay to the earth made the important connection to the early Mesoamerican art displayed towards the end. It seemed as though the curator saved the best for last by displaying the history of ceramic art. This was a great contrast to traditional gallery designs that start with the history or beginning displayed first. Rather in this exhibition, the beginning to the art was displayed last so the viewer could be reminded of the roots and the connection the artist had with the earth and creation. His gallery gave his favorite form of art a voice and distinct connection to the artist with the history of the artistry.

            The gallery itself welcomed viewers with its vibrant palette. The designers had great choices for the all space in respect to the principles of design. The shape of the gallery as he mentioned was custom made by including by specially constructed special walls. There was visual balance within the colors of the gallery itself, such as the classic white tone to respect the historic side of the exhibition so the work stood out on its own. Vibrant turquoise and lime green walls were perfect for the eccentricity of the work. There were some hot pink walls to the pastel pieces and yellow walls to match the actual interior of the collector’s home. These colors gave the exhibit balance and visual rhythm direction. There was talent to the curation of the displays by giving worship to the work. In which, made something inanimate almost come alive by a simple idea conveyed. This idea came to mind when mentioning Robert Chang’s Seated Nude. Rudy mentioned that she needed a space of her own not only for visual focus but to give the eye a break from everything else so that the mind could wander once more in the chaos of analyzing the creations in the exhibition. The highlight of the show for me was to see the working space of a recluse and the life shared in the Maw Collection of pre-Columbian art. Rudy should be praised in his interpersonal skills and relationship he grew over the years. It’s an accomplishment to keep in close relations with the collectors to earn the trust to their valuables.

            I would recommend everyone and everyone to go to the exhibition. In all honesty, I wasn’t educated enough to make a fair judgement in the beginning to go. I thought it would be boring and redundant because clay sounded monotone and lifeless with no forms. I thought I was going to see a bunch of plates and teacups. Instead, I walked into a new look into the world of ceramics and fell in love with its all its oddities and unique forms. Truly this exhibition was in showing the exact reason why collectors would collect this form of art. The same way as described in the beginning of the gallery of how even the smartest crows collect shiny objects as a survival mechanism and for admiration. The utilization for these clay objects not only helped us to the development and sustainability to man, but for a collector to collect a collection of unique objects.

Interveiw with Viva la Muxer

What is your legal name? Noemi Barajas Navarro

What is your artist name? (display name, what name do you go by when creating art?) Noemi Tattoos

Where are you based? Location : Anaheim, Ca.

What is the title of your artwork? Grind Time

The size of the artwork?20”*16”

What is the medium used? Mixed Media

What is the sale price of your artwork? $800

Tell us more about your artwork (600 characters max)

Grind time came from the idea of being the boss lady who kickass while doing it. Its getting down to the “nitty gritty,” bitter sweet love of the world of the workplace. There is a skater girl strolling through the park to take a short cut coming back from work. You see a cityscape in the background when she comes from the big town. She is being dragged by huge responsibilities represented by the scary rabbit and a suit case filled with problems represented by the leg. The scary pink bunny represents responsibilities because responsibilities is something that can seem positive, beneficial, and objective. Yet, we see that some responsibilities come with liability that should be controlled with great care. Some of these responsibilities come too fast in someone’s life and it’s all about how they are tamed or controlled that determines the success of the individual. The leg represents drama in the work force or coming from home life. It is the hidden secret to some to hide away from the workplace or the home. Her uniform represents the conformity and job image. All this is coming from the concept of being a strong person to carry the weight of responsibilities and looking flawless while doing it. Being the boss lady slaying anything that comes her way.

Tell us more about yourself or your artwork (600 characters max) Artist Statement

Starting my first job at the Disneyland Resort as a caricature and portrait artist greatly influenced my style in art from the beginning. I worked hard at maintaining three jobs; an apprenticeship as a tattooer, artist, and character in the resort such as Mickey Mouse. Performing in front of thousands of people not only immersed me in a quirky traumatic world, but I was also able to experience what it would be like as a real cartoon. My art reflected the bold lines and color schemes of a vibrant life I lived. A coworker of mine (national portrait society artist), allowed me to study the traditional way of painting portraits in his private studio at an early age.  I was rigorously trained being trained daily by other coworkers from different university backgrounds about color, anatomy, and staying on top of drawing one hundred mini faces in a day. This eventually burned the image and structure of a portrait in my head, as it became systematic. After leaving the magic kingdom, I was able to study abroad and take in classical Italian artworks and most famous paintings from Europe. After returning home, I told myself to really tame my art as I went back to painting almost Madonnas with elements of nature such as cats, flowers, burning fields, and owls. It was a romantic time in my life after the chaotic noisy world of Disney. I subsequently kept switching from oils in portraits to acrylics in order to experiment with methods. Experimenting lead me to collide these worlds together such as doing classical portraits with dancing skeletons or demon vixens. This came from my tattoo life, I call it a life because of the new culture I had joined after being so conservative and modest. I switched my whole mindset to paint more often for art shows, live art competitions, and commissions. Endless hours on weekly basis strengthened my hands to tolerate such brutality. Getting older allowed me to take more time in putting more details into my art and continuously experimenting with mixed medias. For an example, instead of only doing an oil painting or acrylic painting, I was painting oils on acrylics. I was always taking elements from my surroundings such as painting European toy souvenirs, oddities I collected, the day of the dead culture from my heritage, using my late mentor as a muse, classic Hollywood beauties from my depressed movie nights, to eventually painting myself with landscapes of the most beautiful places I’ve been. My art technique comes from experimenting with my tools, endless hours painting of the mentality to “just do it”, to making it a lifestyle that has become a daily practice of mine.

Website (optional, but can be listed so people can see your work or contact you) www.noemitattoos.com

Instagram (optional, but can be listed so people can see your work or contact you)@noemitattoos

Facebook (optional, but can be listed so people can see your work or contact you)www.facebook.com/noemitattoos

Twitter (optional, but can be listed so people can see your work or contact you)@noemitattoos

Easy Store (optional, but can be listed so people can see your work or contact you)

Email (optional, but can be listed so people can see your work or contact you)noemitattoos@gmail.com

the Song of Encouragement

I never liked to sing because I express myself through art and visual communications. Although I don’t dare to sing, there are certain songs that haunt me. This happens in the morning when I’m getting dressed or brushing my teeth on good days. I’ll tell you these words that chime familiar. They go like this,” It's such a good feeling to know you're alive. It's such a happy feeling; You're growing inside. And when you wake up ready to say: I think I'll make a snappy new day. It's such a good feeling, a very good feeling. The feeling you know, that I'll be back when the day is new. And I'll have more ideas for you. And you'll have things you'll want to talk about. I will too. “These lyrics are written and sung daily by Fred Rogers during his program I watched growing up as a child. I recently watched a speech he did in front of the senate to defend his program from state budget cuts. He emphasized the importance and educational purposes of child development. This speech was delivered in 1969, I watched his program from 1991-1996 during the time my mother was dying of breast cancer. I had watched his program religiously and I feel what he taught me was very valuable that most people nowadays do not take into account. Such good morals as discipline, self-control, kindness, and self-love. Morals sometimes provided by a family.  Not everyone as a child had families growing up and yet his talent was to communicate and remind children of this being a host of the program.  I can thank Rogers for his knowledge I now carry as an adult in the times of tribulation and problem solving. This is the sort of motivation I seek in educating others. I value education not for teaching someone a skill or trade but the sort of work flow that can act as a path during tough times of developing through the ages.

                I can honestly say that I constantly doubt myself, but I have always found other ways to cross these hurdles. I have suffered through emotional problems growing up, abuse, financial difficulties, and family issues. All these can distract a person when trying to achieve goals. The impact I can create in a community through education is to give back this knowledge. The knowledge of encouragement and compassion because sometimes this is what people need. People can problem solve on their own as part of survival. Sometimes all it takes is the encouragement as rogers emphasized in his speech of having that good feeling of self-control and making someone feel special on a daily basis. Gaining focus, determination, and perseverance is all it takes to give to an individual that extra push through tough times. As a community it takes team effort, organization, a goal, and a voice.  Through these old traditional values carried from the 1950’s before modern technology and after the distress of the aftermath of war, can still be kept alive. Keeping humanity in a community is viable to thrive through the education of a healthy society. This is why I want to get into the entertainment arts because making something meaningful or educational for children in the masses I think can impact more lives than in one small community. As I retire from this career, I would like to then teach in a smaller community to continue to press this issue and continue to influence people forever through visual communications whether it was I who taught it or a student who learned from me.

                                                                                                                                 - Noemi Barajas

 

Artist Statement

Artist Statement

Starting my first job at the Disneyland Resort as a caricature and portrait artist greatly influenced my style in art from the beginning. I worked hard at maintaining three jobs; an apprenticeship as a tattooer, artist, and character in the resort such as Mickey Mouse. Performing in front of thousands of people not only immersed me in a quirky traumatic world, but I was also able to experience what it would be like as a real cartoon. My art reflected the bold lines and color schemes of a vibrant life I lived. A coworker of mine (national portrait society artist), allowed me to study the traditional way of painting portraits in his private studio at an early age.  I was rigorously trained being trained daily by other coworkers from different university backgrounds about color, anatomy, and staying on top of drawing one hundred mini faces in a day. This eventually burned the image and structure of a portrait in my head, as it became systematic. After leaving the magic kingdom, I was able to study abroad and take in classical Italian artworks and most famous paintings from Europe. After returning home, I told myself to really tame my art as I went back to painting almost Madonnas with elements of nature such as cats, flowers, burning fields, and owls. It was a romantic time in my life after the chaotic noisy world of Disney. I subsequently kept switching from oils in portraits to acrylics in order to experiment with methods. Experimenting lead me to collide these worlds together such as doing classical portraits with dancing skeletons or demon vixens. This came from my tattoo life, I call it a life because of the new culture I had joined after being so conservative and modest. I switched my whole mindset to paint more often for art shows, live art competitions, and commissions. Endless hours on weekly basis strengthened my hands to tolerate such brutality. Getting older allowed me to take more time in putting more details into my art and continuously experimenting with mixed medias. For an example, instead of only doing an oil painting or acrylic painting, I was painting oils on acrylics. I was always taking elements from my surroundings such as painting European toy souvenirs, oddities I collected, the day of the dead culture from my heritage, using my late mentor as a muse, classic Hollywood beauties from my depressed movie nights, to eventually painting myself with landscapes of the most beautiful places I’ve been. My art technique comes from experimenting with my tools, endless hours painting of the mentality to “just do it”, to making it a lifestyle that has become a daily practice of mine.